Top Non-Medical Therapies for Alzheimer’s

Sometimes the best way to help an Alzheimer’s patient enjoy life is to reach beyond the mind and touch the heart. This is why Susan Greenfield recommends adding music, art, pets and various other non-medical therapies to treat Alzheimer’s patients. Usually, these pastimes help people get past anxiety, stress and depression caused by Alzheimer’s.

Music Therapy

Music can help patients in a lot of ways. For instance, because people often associate songs to memories, music is the perfect way to help an Alzheimer’s patient remember in a non-stressful way. Music also helps change a person’s mood, such as an upbeat song might put a spring in your step or a more gentle song to help you relax.

Pet Therapy

Pet therapy has shown to reduce symptoms of Alzheimer related depression and can also boost self-esteem. For much better results, ensure that the person likes the particular animal before bringing it around. Take note to match the right sort of animal to the person. For example, someone with good coordination might enjoy taking an energetic dog for a short jog but that wouldn’t be as good for someone whose mobility is limited. A less mobile patient can better relate to a cat or smaller gentler dog.

Art Therapy

Art therapy can invigorate a patient’s imagination and allows them to express their feelings more that are difficult to articulate. Just make sure to keep the project on an adult level and ensure that materials are safe and nontoxic.


Aromatherapy or the therapeutic use of scents is another way of drawing a person out through the use of their senses. Aromatherapy is vital since it helps bring back memories and help the person feel connected to nature.

Religious activities

This provides a feeling of peace to a patient and also allows them a chance to remain connected to the real world. It is a great way for the patient to get out of the house and socialize more in the church.

Storytelling and scrapbooking

These activities can be an engaging way to give a patient a lift. Find a quiet place somewhere and try to engage your loved one by asking about the history behind old family photos or by showing pictures and asking them to make up with a story that is based around what is seen in the picture.

Various non-medical therapies and treatments are very useful as part of an Alzheimer’s medication plan. Try some of the therapies that are mentioned here or seek advice from Susan Greenfield for other ideas that will be helpful to your loved one.